Jerome B. Cohen X-ray Diffraction Facility

Cook Hall, 1016
Tel: (847) 491-7810
Facility Director: Michael Bedzyk, MSE
Facility Manager: Jerry Carsello

Visit the J.B. Cohen X-ray Diffraction Facility on the World Wide Web at: http://xray.facilities.northwestern.edu/

FUNCTION: The primary function is to provide general-purpose equipment for X-ray scattering and fluorescence studies. The facility can also provide equipment for non-routine experiments such as, special attachments for high temperatures, vacuum or protective atmospheres, monochromators, special linear and area detectors, etc. Examples of current measurements are: powder diffraction (XRD), single-crystal diffraction, thin-film reflectivity (XRR), thin-film diffraction, crystal truncation rod scattering (CTR), small angle scattering (SAXS), Laue diffraction, pole figures, energy dispersive X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy, x-ray standing waves, high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD), and grazing incidence wide-angle scattering (GIWAXS), and GISAXS. The X-ray lab also functions to help prepare students and postdocs for their beamtime at the Advanced Photon Source (APS).

EQUIPMENT:There are presently thirteen experimental x-ray stations available, five of which have rotating anode sources.

COMPUTERS AND SOFTWARE:All of the x-ray stations operate via networked PC's with
software that allows for control via stepping motors and data collection via counters. A
networked printer and wireless network are provided. Available software includes: ICDD PDF4+ database, MDI-JADE xrd analysis, CrystalMaker, and Laue diffraction software packages are available. LINUX based SPEC and NEWPLOT (also used at the APS) are available on four of the stations.

AVAILABLE APPARATUS:
- Rigaku SmartLab Thin-film Diffraction Workstation: A high intensity 9 kW copper rotating
anode x-ray source is coupled to a multilayer optic. The system has selectable x-ray optical
configurations suitable for: thin-film work with single crystal, amorphous, or poly-crystalline
samples. Also, high intensity powder diffraction. Additionally supported are grazing incidence,
in-plane diffraction geometries, pole figures and reciprocal space mapping. Other features are: 5-axis goniometer, Ge(220) 2-bounce channel cut post monochromator, horizontal sample mounting permitting work with liquid samples and a high speed 1-D detector in addition to a high count-rate scintillation detector.

- Rigaku ATX-G Thin-film Diffraction Workstation: A high intensity 18 kW copper x-ray rotating anode source is coupled to a multilayer mirror. The system has selectable x-ray optical configurations suitable for work with single crystal, thin-film or poly-crystalline film samples. Also supported are grazing incidence, in-plane diffraction geometries, pole figures, reciprocal space mapping, and large-size wafer sample mounting. Other features are the 5-axis goniometer with several 4-crystal monochromators that couple to the multilayer mirror.

- Rigaku S-MAX 3000 High Brilliance SAXS-WAXS System with a Cu Kα MicroMax source, KB
multilayer mirror focusing monochromator, automated sample changer for SAXS-WAXS, and
goniometer attachment for GISAXS-GIWAXS. A Bruker Vantec 2000 2-D detector collects the
SAXS-GISAXS pattern and a Fuji image plate collects the WAXS-GIWAXS pattern. The Q-range is 0.01 to 1Å-1. Capabilities also include a Linkam temperature control stage (-50 to 300°C).

- 18 kW Mo Rigaku: Mo target rotating anode with vertical line source and high-resolution Huber 2-circle diffractometer with Osmic Max-Flux multi-layer mirror wide band-pass monochromator, coupled to (111), (220), or (400) Si 2-bounce channel-cut post-monochromator, SPEC software control, high-count rate scintillation detector, automated beam attenuator and multi-channel analyzer XRF spectroscopy system.

- 12 kW Cu Rigaku: Cu target rotating anode with vertical line source and high-resolution Huber 2-circle diffractometer with Osmic Max-Flux multi-layer mirror wide band-pass monochromator, coupled to a postmonochromator stage for a (111), (220), or (400) Si 2-bounce channel-cut or(111) Ge 2-bounce collimator, SPEC software control, high-count rate s cintillation detector, automated beam attenuator and multi-channel analyzer fluorescence spectroscopy system.

- 18 kW Cu Rigaku: Medium resolution Huber 4-circle diffractometer with double-focusing
Graphite (002) monochromator and SPEC software control and automated beam attenuator.

- Rigaku Ultima IV: Automated powder diffraction stations featuring: high temperature
environmental chamber for ambient to 1500°C work, a ten sample multi-sample changer,
horizontal sample mounting permitting work with liquid samples and a high speed 1-D detector permitting high volume sample throughput, in addition to a high count-rate scintillation detector.

- Scintag XDS2000: Automated diffraction system, with four-circle pole-figure and residual
stress device, thin film diffraction attachment and solid-state detector.

- Rigaku Dmax: Automated powder diffraction stations featuring Jade Analysis software.

- Blake High-Resolution tangential goniometer: 4-Bounce dispersive +- Si(220) monochromator with encoded high-angle resolution rocking curve/scan system. Sealed tube Cu x-ray source.

- PC data analysis workstation: MDI-JADE powder diffraction analysis software, CrystalMaker
diffraction simulation software, ICDD PDF4+ powder diffraction database and Laue analysis
software.

OTHER AVAILABLE EQUIPMENT:
- A variety of x-ray anode targets and source sizes to accommodate the four high-intensity
rotating anode generators and the eight sealed- tube x-ray generators.

- Various Si, Ge, Graphite and LiF crystals and multi-layer mirrors are available for incident or diffracted beam monochromators.

- Five solid-state XRF detectors including a Vortex high count rate detector with associated
electronics, SCA's and MCA's.

- Three gas-filled 1-dimesional linear position sensitive detectors.

- Variety of image plate and x-ray film cameras: Laue, rotating crystal, cylindrical, Buerger
precession, Debye-Scherrer.

 

The Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) is supported by the National Science Foundation under NSF Award Number DMR-1121262. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Science Foundation.
© 2012 Northwestern University